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Ayurvedic

 

Your green-juice-a-day habit just got hotter. I just tried this recipe and am amazed by how filling and delicious it is.

This is from my friends at Well and Good. Here are the benefits to the green juice you are supposed to drink warm:

Meet the Ayurvedic One-a-Day, a green juice/soup fusion from Kye’s Montana in Santa Monica that’s—get this—meant to be sipped warm. Yes, warm.

This healthy concoction ($6), which flies off the menu, “combines the benefits of juice detoxes and soup cleanses and all their nourishing benefits,” explains Kye’s founder Jeanne Cheng, who studied holistic medicine with Ayurvedic doctor Vaidya Mishra. The recipe is his genius.

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coconut water

The clear liquid from inside young, green coconuts is known as “coconut water,” and makes for a wonderful, delicious, nutritious drink!

Coconut water is a fantastic source of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes (like potassium, magnesium, and sodium), and phytonutrients. These qualities make it an effective (and yummy) method for treating and preventing dehydration – especially for young athletes!

While coconut water is an excellent thirst quencher, there are definitely some things to consider before making it your everyday beverage of choice.

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juicing

I am often asked, “which is healthier: juicing or smoothies?”

In fact, smoothies and juices serve different purposes. The health benefits of juices vs. smoothies depend entirely on your desired nutritional outcome.

I make smoothies when I need a nutritious snack, filled with protein and fiber, to hold me over. On the other hand, when I need a boost (especially in the morning) I turn to juicing. Fresh pressed juice is essentially a direct shot of vitamins, minerals, and enzymes into your system – a great coffee substitute for those looking to ditch caffeine.

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gut

Do you ever feel sluggish or run down? Have heartburn and tummy troubles become unwelcome daily companions?

When our digestive system isn’t working properly, it’s our body’s way of telling us something is off balance. Making small shifts in eating habits and managing stress can be the keys that allow your body to do its business properly.

Some of the signs of digestive distress can include, but are not limited to:

  • Heartburn
  • Frequent stomach ache
  • Burping
  • Gas after a meal
  • Constipation
  • Acne (adult and teen)

A working digestive system is one of the most important components to optimum health and wellness. Asking yourself some important questions can pinpoint the underlying issue that may be causing digestive distress.

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meal prep hacks

 

So, You’re on board with a “whole foods” lifestyle, great! Now if you could only find the time to make it happen…

My secret to success is meal prep. That means I designate a time to cook large amounts of healthy food ahead of time, with a plan to use it throughout the week. That way, when I’ve spent the afternoon running my darlings from tae-kwon-do to dance lessons, I don’t have empty plates staring me in the face when I get home, or feel the temptation to fill them with something quick and processed.

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fruit

Banana:

Bananas pack a nutritional punch as they are rich in potassium. Potassium is an essential mineral in maintaining normal blood pressure and an important component in cardiovascular health. They have a unique mix of vitamins and minerals and provide low glycemic carbohydrates making them ideal for athletic performance. Additional health benefits may include lowering the risk of certain cancers and asthma and promoting regularity.

note: people who are taking beta-blockers should be conscious of high potassium foods as beta blockers tend to increase potassium in the blood. Consult with your doctor about regulating and monitoring your potassium levels.

1 small banana:

Vitamin B6: 25% DV
Manganese: 16% DV
Vitamin C: 14% DV
Potassium: 12% DV
Fiber: 12% Dv

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Strawberries:

Strawberries are rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients including quercetin, anthocyanins and polyphenols. They are also rich in the essential nutrients folic acid, fiber and vitamin C. One cup of fresh strawberries provides 160% of your daily vitamin C needs. They have been shown to support cardiovascular health, improve regulation of blood sugar, as well as prevent certain cancers. They are a go to treat in my family in smoothies or diced and served with yogurt or a summer salad.

1 cup:

Vitamin C: 113% DV
Manganese: 28% DV
Fiber: 12% DV
Iodine: 12%
Folate: 9% DV
Potassium: 6% DV
Magnesium: 5% DV

Kiwi fruit on wooden background

Kiwi:

Kiwis are a nutrient dense food meaning they are high in nutrients but low in calories. They are rich in antioxidants, vitamin C, fiber and potassium. Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin that neutralizes those icky free radicals that cause damage to cells. The possible benefits of consuming kiwis and many other fruits includes a reduced risk for heart disease, diabetes, obesity and some cancers.

1 cup:

Vitamin C: 85% DV
Vitamin K: 31% DV
Copper: 10% DV
Fiber: 8% DV
Vitamin E: 7% DV
Potassium: 6% DV

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Blueberry:

These are rich in the flavanoid, anthocyanin and the polyphenol, quercetin that contribute to a host of their health benefits.  They are rich in iron, phosphorous, calcium, zinc and vitamin k that contribute to building and maintaining bone strength. Blueberries have been shown to improve heart health, cognitive function, regulate blood sugar levels, improve digestion, fight wrinkles and contain anti-cancer benefits. I like to incorporate these nutrient dense berries to my smoothies with some protein powder and almond milk.

1 cup:

Vitamin K: 32% DV
Manganese: 25% DV
Vitamin C: 19% DV
Fiber 14% DV

watermelon

Watermelon:

Watermelons are synonymous with summer and help to quench your thirst after a workout. They are rich in anti-inflammatory compounds and provide antioxidant support for cardiovascular health. They are rich in lycopene, zinc, choline,copper, vitamin B6, vitamin A, potassium, and vitamin C. The antioxidant beta carotene provides eye health and heart health. Consuming watermelon can contribute to overall improved digestion and regularity, improved hydration, reduced inflammation and muscle soreness and improved skin texture due to its high vitamin A content. I like to make watermelon and mint juices for extra hydration after a long workout.

1 cup:

Vitamin C: 16% DV
Pantothenic Acid: 7% DV
Copper: 7% DV
Vitamin A: 5% DV
Biotin: 5%DV

avocado

Avocado:

These are rich in monounsaturated fats (the healthy fat) that provide a wide range of anti-inflammatory benefits. Similar to all fresh fruits they are nutrient dense as well. They are rich in the carotenoid family that provide protection for the heart and eyes, promote blood sugar regulation, may prevent osteoporosis because of their high vitamin K content and improve digestion and regularity.

I add them to my salads or smoothies for a dose of my daily good oils or make a homemade guacamole.

https://iquitsugar.com/recipe/super-speedy-guacamole/

1 cup:

Pantothenic Acid: 42% DV
Fiber: 40% DV
Vitamin K: 35%
Copper: 31% DV
Folate: 30% DV
Vitamin B6: 23% DV
Vitamin E: 21% DV
Potassium: 21% DV
Vitamin C: 20% DV

lemon slice

Lemon:

Lemons are rich in phytonutrients and provide an antibiotic affect on our body. They are rich in vitamin C that is the main antioxidant in our body. Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that neutralizes free radicals present in our body. Vitamin C supports a strong immune system so it is helpful in fighting colds, flus and ear infections.Additionally, they help to maintain a healthy complexion because of their vitamin C content which plays a vital role in collagen formation, they increase iron absorption when combined with iron rich foods (spinach or chickpeas) and may prevent asthma. Lemons increase detoxification in the body because it activates the release of bile which acts as an emulsifier for fat and removes fat soluble toxins.

I squeeze lemon juice and some of the zest into a warm glass of water every morning for digestive health and my daily dose of vitamin C.

¼ cup:

Vitamin C: 31% DV
Folate: 3% DV

 

 

pantry veggies

Spinach:

Remember Popeye? Studies show that consumption of spinach can be helpful in reducing the risk of prostate cancer. It is rich in health promoting phytonutrients that provide antioxidant benefits. Spinach is also high in oxalic acid, so it can be helpful to boil it for a minute to reduce the levels of acidity.

1 cup provides:

Vitamin K: 987% DV
Vitamin A: 106% DV
Manganese: 84% DV
Iron: 36% DV
Copper: 34% DV
Vitamin B2: 32% DV
Vitamin B6: 26% DV
Vitamin C: 14% DV
Vitamin E: 25% DV
Calcium: 24% DV
Potassium: 24% DV
Fiber: 17% DV

Bell Peppers:

Bell peppers are an excellent source of carotenoids, especially beta-carotene and zeaxanthin, and are high in vitamin C (even more than oranges). They contain anti-inflammatory properties and provide anti-cancer benefits.

1 cup provides:

Vitamin C: 157% DV
Vitamin B6: 16%
Vitamin A: 16%
Folate: 11%
Vitamin E: 10%

Romaine:

Not all lettuce is created equal! Romaine is high in vitamin K and vitamin A, and packed with other vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and fiber. This is a heart healthy addition to any meal, as it can help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol. The high folic acid content is beneficial for converting bad homocysteine (contributes to heart disease) into a benign substance.

2 cups provide:

Vitamin K: 107% DV
Vitamin A: 45% DV
Folate; 32%
Molybdenum: 13% DV
Vitamin C: 5% DV
Potassium: 7% DV
Manganese: 8% DV

Beets:

Beets contain phytonutrients called betalains. They provide anti-inflammatory and detoxifying support.

1 cup provides:

Folate: 34% DV
Manganese: 28% DV
Potassium: 15% DV
Copper: 14% DV

Tomato:

Tomatoes are rich in lycopene and antioxidants, and are known to support bone health. Studies show that tomatoes are also linked with heart health because they contribute to lowering total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

1 medium-sized whole tomato provides:

Vitamin A: 20% DV
Biotin: 24% DV
Vitamin K: 16% DV
Vitamin C: 28% DV
Vitamin B6: 5% DV
Magnesium: 5% DV
Potassium: 292mg

Mushrooms:

Mushrooms provide immune support, as well as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits. They are rich in B vitamins, which provide homocysteine regulation and thus, cardiovascular health.

I add my mushrooms to stir fry or sauces for the kiddos to enjoy.

1 cup:

Copper: 40% DV
Selenium: 35% DV
Vitamin B2: 27% DV
Pantothenic Acid: 22% DV
Vitamin B3: 17% DV
Phosphorous: 12% DV
Potassium: 9% DV
Zinc: 7%
Vitamin B1: 6%

Zucchini:

Zucchini is a rich source of antioxidants and helps regulate blood sugar levels with anti-inflammatory benefits. Studies indicate they support a healthy prostate and provide anti-cancer benefits as well.

I add grated zucchini to my sauces, or grill them with a little olive oil.

1 cup:

Copper: 21% DV
Manganese: 19% DV
Vitamin C: 13% DV
Magnesium: 11% DV
Fiber: 10% DV
Phosphorous: 10% DV
Potassium: 10% DV
Folate: 9% DV
Vitamin B1: 7$ DV
Vitamin K: 7% DV
Vitamin B6: 7% DV
Vitamin B3: 6% DV

Broccoli:

The health benefits of broccoli are far reaching. They provide cancer protection, contain anti-inflammatory properties, and protect against oxidative stress. The high fiber content provides digestive support.

I add broccoli to my stir fry, or just steam it and add a little butter.

1 cup:

Vitamin K: 245% DV
Vitamin C: 135% DV
Chromium: 53% DV
Folate: 42% DV
Fiber: 21%DV
Pantothenic Acid: 19% DV
Vitamin B6: 18% DV
Vitamin E: 15% DV
Phosphorous: 15% DV
Manganese: 15% DV
Choline: 15% DV
Vitamin B2: 15% DV
Vitamin A: 13% DV
Potassium: 13% DV

Kale:

Kale is a powerhouse vegetable that is rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Kale contains glucosinolates that provide cancer preventative benefits, as well as cardiovascular support. It can be helpful in detoxifying the body too!

I like to use it in my juices or add it to sauces.

1 cup:

Vitamin K: 1180% DV
Vitamin A: 98% DV
Vitamin C: 71% DV
Manganese: 27% DV
Copper: 22% DV
Vitamin B6: 11%DV
Fiber: 10% DV
Calcium: 9%DV
Potassium: 8%DV
Iron: 7% DV
Vitamin E: 7%DV
Vitamin B2: 7%DV
Magnesium: 6%DV
Vitamin B1:6%
Protein: 5%
Phosphorous: 5% DV

Eggplant:

Eggplants are rich in the phytonutrient nasunin, a potent antioxidant that prevents cells from oxidative damage. It also provides cardiovascular support by reducing cholesterol levels. I like to make grilled eggplant or baba ganoush to serve with sliced veggies.

1 cup:

Fiber: 10% DV
Copper: 7% DV
Vitamin B1: 7% DV
Manganese: 6% DV
Vitamin B6: 5% DV
Vitamin B3: 4% DV
Potassium: 3% DV

Cucumber:

Cucumbers are rich in three phytonutrients: flavonoids, lignans, and triterpenes. These all provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer benefits.

I like to use them in my juices for hydration and detoxification, as well as cut up to be served with hummus or baba ganoush.

1 cup:

Vitamin K: 19% DV
Molybdenum: 12% DV
Pantothenic Acid: 5% DV
Potassium: 4% DV
Phosphorous: 4% DV
Copper: 4% DV
Manganese: 4% DV
Vitamin C: 4% DV
Vitamin B1: 3% DV

 

 

 

 

Now that you are on board with a whole foods diet, let’s incorporate some spices to your grocery basket! Maybe you avoid the spice aisle because it seems overwhelming, but here are three spices that pack a punch to any dish – and supply healthy benefits to any kitchen.

spices

Turmeric:

Turmeric has been used for thousands of years in India and China because of its healthy benefits. Turmeric is a medicinal spice that contains Curcumin, a pharmacological agent that has powerful antioxidant benefits, proven to be helpful in treating arthritis, heartburn, stomach pain, intestinal gas and bloating, headaches, colds, and menstrual problems. Its properties have been proven to be as effective as hydrocortisone and Motrin for treating inflammation.

Turmeric can be a well tolerated alternative in treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes, but is not limited to Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Curcumin has also been touted as having cancer preventative properties. The antioxidant properties protect against the free radicals that can damage cells.

Last but not least, turmeric can improve liver function and contribute to lowering cholesterol levels.

It can be added any sauce, or I like to grate fresh turmeric and add it to my smoothies in the morning – to start the day with a quick jolt of that caffeine feeling, but without the caffeine!

http://simplegreensmoothies.com/green-smoothie-recipes/tropical-turmeric-cleanser

It can be found in the grocery aisle of any health food store.

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nuts

Cashews:

Cashews are rich in copper, manganese, phosphorous, and vitamin K. These vitamins and minerals help to diminish frequency of migraines, lower blood pressure, protect against heart disease, and provide bone strength. They contain NO cholesterol. They contain oleic acid, which is also found in olive oil – both are good for you!

Serving Size: 1 oz.

Calories: 157
Fat: 12.4g
Carbs: 8.56g
Protein: 5.17g

66% aft, 22% carbs, 12% protein

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superfoods

Goji Berries:

Goji berries is both a fruit and an herb and an excellent source of antioxidants. They are loaded with beta-carotene that promotes healthy skin. They are also high in fiber that contributes to regular bowel movements. There are claims that it is a remedy for diabetes, hypertension, malaria and fever. You can eat them raw or soak them before eating. I eat these plain or mixed with cashews. They are also a nice addition to any smoothie.

They can be found at any natural food store or even online.

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